Thoughts

“Traveling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller.” – Ibn Battuta

I hope to travel again soon. I miss being somewhere other than here. So many places I want to see, and the days are ticking by…

Pieces of my mind

This thought just occurred to me. This may or may not be the right time for it, but I’m writing it down.

We want professional peace officers, correct? A few agencies require a bachelor’s degree to be an officer because they recognize that the time spent in college that results in a degree produces a more well-rounded person. College, generally, gives one a wider worldview, a more all-encompassing, all-embracing perspective.

What’s the problem? Not everyone can afford a college education in America. Lots of good candidates can’t afford the degree.

Solution: 1) Require the degree to be an officer 2) Make college free Problem solved. Those that want to be cops will go through college, turning them into a more “well-rounded” person, and money won’t be a barrier.

I see you.

(The photo links to the original article)

It’s fortuitous that I would see and read this article today because just this morning I had an encounter with a homeless person.

He was sitting at the exit from the subway, saying to each person that passed by, “Can you spare a dollar or two for me?”  When it was my turn for him to address me I said “Not today. Sorry” and continued on my way.

Half way up the escalator I felt ashamed. I thought of Jesus’ words regarding what we do for the least of our brothers. I wondered if that was Jesus and I failed the test. Not only had I ignored this brother, but I had lied to him. He had asked if I could spare a dollar or two and I said no.

That wasn’t true. I certainly could have spared a dollar or two. I just didn’t want to. Well, that’s not entirely true. I said “no” automatically, as if by rote.

I walked the rest of the way to work thinking about what I could do differently. (Mind you, I felt bad, but my pride wouldn’t let me go back. Silly, I know, and I’m ashamed of it now.) My thought at that time was that I could put a few $1’s in my front pocket so as to be prepared for this next time. This article gave me more ideas as to what I could do.

I hope it gives you some also.

Despre toamnă, a șasea parte (About Autumn, part 6) and Happy Thanksgiving

(You can find parts 1-4 here, and part 5 here.)

img_20181202_154233_845-1Here it is, the day before Thanksgiving and time to write my semiregular post on Autumn. The last was written in mid-October of 2017, over two years ago. I never got around to writing it last year, most likely because this time last year I was looking forward to another trip to Bucharest and not necessarily dreading the season. I was looking forward to the centenary of Romania’s Great Union Day, the parade, the Christmas Market at Piata Constitutiei, the street decorations, possibly a day trip to Brasov, and maybe even a little snow. All of that came to pass, and I had a wonderful time.

For the first time in forever (apologies to Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez for borrowing your line), Continue reading “Despre toamnă, a șasea parte (About Autumn, part 6) and Happy Thanksgiving”

Quote of the day

“And then there is the most dangerous risk of all — the risk of spending your life not doing what you want on the bet you can buy yourself the freedom to do it later.”

― Randy Komisar, The Monk and the Riddle: The Education of a Silicon Valley Entrepreneur

Quote of the Day

“Even more despised than the Brunch People are the vegetarians. Serious cooks regard these members of the dining public—and their Hezbollah-like splinter faction, the vegans—as enemies of everything that’s good and decent in the human spirit. To live life without veal or chicken stock, fish cheeks, sausages, cheese, or organ meats is treasonous.”
Anthony Bourdain